Webinars

WINDExchange hosts a series of webinars on current wind energy issues. Audiovisual files and text versions of each webinar are available.

Upcoming

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Tethys Wind Webinar

June 25, 2018 | 12:00 p.m. 1:00 p.m. Eastern | Add to calendar

Tethys is an online knowledge management system that provides comprehensive information on the environmental effects of wind (both land-based and offshore) and marine renewable energy with the goal of advancing the industry in an environmentally responsible manner. Since the official launch in 2012, Tethys has established an international reputation around the collection and synthesis of environmental information made publicly available. To learn more, join an upcoming webinar that will showcase the content and resources available on Tethys. DOE’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory developed Tethys to support DOE’s Wind Energy Technologies Office and Water Power Technologies Office.

The Future of Electrification and What It Means for Clean Energy

June 26, 2018 | 1:00 p.m. 2:00 p.m. Eastern | Add to calendar

There is great potential for electricity to replace liquid and solid fuels for transportation, industrial processes, agriculture, and heating and cooling. In April the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) published the U.S. National Electrification Assessment, which examines four possible pathways of how electrification could proceed in the coming years and decades. In the report’s most ambitious scenario, electricity's share of total energy supply would rise from 19% today to 50% by 2050.

In this webinar, EPRI Senior Program Manager Francisco de la Chesnaye will present the report’s findings and discuss the potential implications for state renewable energy initiatives. There will be opportunity for audience questions.

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2018 Tribal Energy Webinar: Evaluating Tribal Utility Authority Opportunities

June 27, 2018 | 1:00 p.m. 3:00 p.m. Eastern | Add to calendar

The DOE Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs and the Western Area Power Administration will co-sponsor the 2018 webinar series Tribal Sovereignty and Self-Determination through Community Energy Development. The series is intended for tribal leaders, tribal staff, and others interested in energy development on tribal lands. During the June webinar, tribal leaders and community members will learn about the benefits and challenges of forming a tribal utility authority, including the many opportunities associated with wholesale tariffs, direct access service, net-metering arrangements, and use of substations and infrastructure, among other utility services. Attendees will also learn about the unique authority of sovereign nations to select new energy service providers, implement imminent domain, license dams, and negotiate right-of-way agreements.

If you cannot attend the live webinars, you can access recordings and slides of past webinars.

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2018 Tribal Energy Webinar: Request For Proposal (RFP) Strategies for Tribal Community Energy Projects

July 25, 2018 | 1:00 p.m. 3:00 p.m. Eastern | Add to calendar

The DOE Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs and the Western Area Power Administration will co-sponsor the 2018 webinar series Tribal Sovereignty and Self-Determination through Community Energy Development. The series is intended for tribal leaders, tribal staff, and others interested in energy development on tribal lands.

A request for proposal (RFP) is a useful tool to procure valuable assets and/or services for energy projects. During the July webinar, attendees will learn how to develop RFPs that effectively reflect tribal community energy plans and encourage qualified bidders to respond. Attendees will also learn how a request for information (RFI) can be used to help inform the development of an RFP. Using the information from the webinar, tribes can ensure their RFPs have wide distribution and high-quality responses. The webinar will also discuss key considerations for tribes when responding to an electric utility RFP for energy development.

If you cannot attend the live webinars, you can access recordings and slides of past webinars.

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Clean Energy States Alliance Webinar: Building Markets: Energy Storage in Massachusetts and Offshore Wind in Rhode Island

Aug. 9, 2018 | 1:00 p.m. 2:30 p.m. Eastern | Add to calendar

This webinar highlights two winning programs from Clean Energy States Alliance's 2018 State Leadership in Clean Energy Awards: Massachusetts’ Advancing Commonwealth Energy Storage Program and Rhode Island’s Block Island Offshore Wind Farm. In two very different ways, each program is successfully advancing emerging clean energy technologies in their state. Guest speakers from the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center and the Rhode Island Office of Energy Resources will present.

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2018 Tribal Energy Webinar: Utility-Scale Energy Development

Aug. 29, 2018 | 1:00 p.m. 3:00 p.m. Eastern | Add to calendar

The DOE Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs and the Western Area Power Administration will co-sponsor the 2018 webinar series Tribal Sovereignty and Self-Determination through Community Energy Development. The series is intended for tribal leaders, tribal staff, and others interested in energy development on tribal lands.

Utility-scale energy development is similar in many ways to smaller-scale energy development, but it can present unique challenges in key areas such as permitting, financing, interconnection to the grid, and finding customers for the energy produced. During the August webinar, attendees will hear about common challenges faced by tribes for utility-scale energy development and ideas for how to approach these challenges.

If you cannot attend the live webinars, you can access recordings and slides of past webinars.

Register

2018 Tribal Energy Webinar: Facility- and Community-Scale Project Development

Sept. 26, 2018 | 1:00 p.m. 3:00 p.m. Eastern | Add to calendar

The DOE Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs and the Western Area Power Administration will co-sponsor the 2018 webinar series Tribal Sovereignty and Self-Determination through Community Energy Development. The series is intended for tribal leaders, tribal staff, and others interested in energy development on tribal lands.

Taking on facility-and community-scale energy projects can be a good way for tribes to gain experience and expertise in project development while limiting risk, but like utility-scale projects, these projects also have their own unique challenges. For example, tribes often run into difficulty when it comes to finding money to build these smaller-scale projects. This webinar will outline options for financing and addressing other challenges related to facility- and community-scale project development. Attendees will learn about available financing mechanisms that can allow tribes to develop projects with limited to no upfront capital costs, including community solar models, third-party vendors, energy savings performance contracts, and utility energy service contracts.

If you cannot attend the live webinars, you can access recordings and slides of past webinars.

Register

2018 Tribal Energy Webinar: Distributed Energy Technology Trends and Costs

Oct. 31, 2018 | 1:00 p.m. 3:00 p.m. Eastern | Add to calendar

The DOE Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs and the Western Area Power Administration will co-sponsor the 2018 webinar series Tribal Sovereignty and Self-Determination through Community Energy Development. The series is intended for tribal leaders, tribal staff, and others interested in energy development on tribal lands.

The capabilities and costs of distributed energy technologies continue to evolve rapidly. This webinar will provide tribes with an update on recent technological and cost trends for distributed energy. Speakers will discuss the latest developments in conventional and renewable distributed generation technologies, along with energy storage options that in some cases can make these energy sources more reliable and valuable. Attendees will learn unique characteristics of these technologies, find out how they are competing in the marketplace, and understand how to use them separately or combined for the greatest benefit to their tribal community.

If you cannot attend the live webinars, you can access recordings and slides of past webinars.

Register

2018 Tribal Energy Webinar: Tribal Microgrid Case Studies

Nov. 28, 2018 | 1:00 p.m. 3:00 p.m. Eastern | Add to calendar

The DOE Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs and the Western Area Power Administration will co-sponsor the 2018 webinar series Tribal Sovereignty and Self-Determination through Community Energy Development. The series is intended for tribal leaders, tribal staff, and others interested in energy development on tribal lands.

As microgrid technology continues to become more affordable, reliable, and advanced, tribes are looking at microgrids as a viable option to provide electric service to their members. This webinar will provide an overview of microgrid systems and technologies and how they can be used in tribal communities for emergency situations, to provide reliability, or to increase independence. Speakers will highlight the benefits and challenges for tribes considering developing, owning, and operating a microgrid. Case studies will share the reasons for and lessons learned by tribes that have successfully developed their own microgrids.

If you cannot attend the live webinars, you can access recordings and slides of past webinars.

Register

Past

Webinars from the past 2 years are listed below. For previous webinars, contact us.

U.S. Wind Turbine Database: Data and Online Viewer Webinar

April 23, 2018

This webinar provides an overview of the U.S. Wind Turbine Database and Viewer—a comprehensive dataset of U.S. wind turbine locations and characteristics that is easily accessible, more accurate, and updated more often than existing wind turbine datasets. The database contains more than 57,000 turbines, constructed from the 1980s through 2018, and includes characteristics such as the turbines' make and model, height, rotor diameter, year of installation, and rated capacity. This project was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Energy Technologies Office and developed in partnership with the U.S. Geological Survey, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and the American Wind Energy Association.

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Webinar Series: Understanding Wind Project Neighbors through a National Survey of Attitudes: Comparing Strongly Annoyed Individuals with Symptoms near U.S. Turbines to Those in Surveyed European Communities

March 13, 2018

Achieving continued increasing wind energy deployment levels will require coordination and cooperation with the communities and community members in which the wind power projects will be located, including local authorities, citizens, landowners, businesses, and non-governmental organizations. In 2015, DOE funded Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to lead a 4-year project collecting data from individuals living near U.S. wind power projects. The aim was to widen the understanding of how U.S. communities are reacting to the deployment of wind turbines and to provide insights to those communities considering wind projects.

To share the results of their analysis, the Lawrence Berkeley researchers will host a four-part webinar series, Understanding Wind Project Neighbors through a National Survey of Attitudes, every other Tuesday starting January 30 at 1 p.m. ET. This fourth webinar will focus on an investigation of individuals who are “strongly” annoyed (i.e., annoyed with symptoms) and will compare results between this U.S. study and other studies in Europe to examine differences and correlates.

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Webinar Series: Understanding Wind Project Neighbors through a National Survey of Attitudes: Predicting Audibility of and Annoyance to Wind Power Project Sounds Using Modeled Sound

Feb. 27, 2018

Achieving continued increasing wind energy deployment levels will require coordination and cooperation with the communities and community members in which the wind power projects will be located, including local authorities, citizens, landowners, businesses, and non-governmental organizations. In 2015, DOE funded Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to lead a 4-year project collecting data from individuals living near U.S. wind power projects. The aim was to widen the understanding of how U.S. communities are reacting to the deployment of wind turbines and to provide insights to those communities considering wind projects.

To share the results of their analysis, the Lawrence Berkeley researchers will host a four-part webinar series, Understanding Wind Project Neighbors through a National Survey of Attitudes, every other Tuesday starting January 30 at 1 p.m. ET. This third webinar will focus on an investigation of various predictors of reported ability to hear turbines and stated sound annoyance, including modeled project sound levels, local background sound levels, objective measures of people and place, and self-reported subjective descriptors.

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Webinar Series: Understanding Wind Project Neighbors through a National Survey of Attitudes: Wind Power Project Planning Process Fairness and Attitudes

Feb. 13, 2018

Achieving continued increasing wind energy deployment levels will require coordination and cooperation with the communities and community members in which the wind power projects will be located, including local authorities, citizens, landowners, businesses, and non-governmental organizations. In 2015, DOE funded Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to lead a 4-year project collecting data from individuals living near U.S. wind power projects. The aim was to widen the understanding of how U.S. communities are reacting to the deployment of wind turbines and to provide insights to those communities considering wind projects.

To share the results of their analysis, the Lawrence Berkeley researchers hosted a four-part webinar series, Understanding Wind Project Neighbors through a National Survey of Attitudes, starting January 30, 2018. This second webinar focused on an investigation of various predictors of stated planning process fairness and relative influences of planning process fairness on attitudes.

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Webinar Series: Understanding Wind Project Neighbors through a National Survey of Attitudes: Overall Analysis of Attitudes of 1,700 Wind Power Project Neighbors

Jan. 30, 2018

Achieving continued increasing wind energy deployment levels will require coordination and cooperation with the communities and community members in which the wind power projects will be located, including local authorities, citizens, landowners, businesses, and non-governmental organizations. In 2015, DOE funded Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to lead a 4-year project collecting data from individuals living near U.S. wind power projects. The aim was to widen the understanding of how U.S. communities are reacting to the deployment of wind turbines and to provide insights to those communities considering wind projects.

To share the results of their analysis, the Lawrence Berkeley researchers hosted a four-part webinar series, Understanding Wind Project Neighbors through a National Survey of Attitudes, starting January 30, 2018. This first webinar focused on results from an investigation of relative influences of correlates of attitudes across all 1,704 respondents, with focus on pre- vs. post-construction differences.

Energy Department's Distributed Wind Industry Update: A WINDExchange Webinar

Sept. 28, 2016

Compared with traditional, centralized power plants, distributed wind energy installations supply power directly to homes, farms, schools, businesses, manufacturing facilities, and communities. Turbines used in these applications can range in size from a few hundred watts to several megawatts. The Energy Department and its Pacific Northwest National Laboratory recently published the 2015 Distributed Wind Market Report, which shows that U.S. wind turbines in distributed applications reached a cumulative installed capacity of more than 934 megawatts from approximately 75,000 turbines—enough to power more than 142,000 average American homes.

One segment of the distributed wind industry involves wind turbines deployed in the built environment: in, on, or near buildings. The built-environment wind turbine niche of the wind industry is still developing and is relatively less mature than the utility-scale wind or traditional distributed wind sectors. The Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory recently published Deployment of Wind Turbines in the Built Environment: Risks, Lessons, and Recommended Practices, a report that investigates the current state of the BEWT industry by reviewing available literature on BEWT projects as well as interviewing project owners on their experiences deploying and operating the technology.

Audio and text versions of the webinar are available (MP4 38.8 MB). Download Windows Media Player. Time: 00:45:11. Text Version.

Download the presentations:
2015 Distributed Wind Market Report Presentation
Built-Environment Report Summary for WINDExchange

Energy Department's Wind Industry Update: A WINDExchange Webinar

Sept. 21, 2016

The United States ranks second in the world for wind power capacity and remains first in the world for electricity generated from wind power, according to the 2015 Wind Technologies Market Report released by the Energy Department and its Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Total installed wind power capacity from turbines rated at more than 100 kilowatts in the United States grew at an impressive rate of 12% in 2015 and stands at nearly 74 gigawatts, meeting an estimated 5.6% of U.S. end-use electricity demand in an average year. The nearly 8.6 gigawatts of capacity installed during 2015—representing more new deployment than any other electricity source—is a 77% increase over total installations in 2014. The report also finds that wind energy continues to be sold at attractive prices through power purchase agreements, making this renewable energy source fully cost-competitive with traditional power sources in many parts of the United States. In fact, wind generated a total of more than 190 million megawatt hours of electricity in 2015—enough to power more than 19 million average U.S. homes and save the equivalent of more than 130 million metric tons of carbon dioxide in 2015.

The report also illustrates how the U.S. wind industry has positively impacted the American workforce by currently supporting 88,000 jobs related to development, siting, manufacturing, transportation, and other industries—an increase of 15,000 jobs in 2015.

Audio and text versions of the webinar are available (MP4 49.5 MB). Download Windows Media Player. Time: 00:53:40. Text Version.

Download the presentation:
2015 Wind Market Report Presentation